Fall Courses

Fall 2018

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Off-Site Studio Courses

For Fall 2018

These courses are for UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY and require:

-Upper-division standing
-A resume
-Letter of Interest

Please see the instructions listed in the course descriptions.

Deadline to apply is at NOON on Monday, April 2nd.

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Making Real World Design @ argo design

Unique: TBD, ITD 170
Instructor: Kevin McDonald
Room: Off-campus at argo design studios (weekly shuttle transportation is provided)
Meeting times: Wednesdays 4-7pm (at argo) for five weeks on these dates: 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27 and Mondays 4-7pm during this time frame for group work on-campus. 

As you transition from your design education to working in the design field, you are going to need a set of skills, tactics and mechanisms to succeed. Most people develop those strategies over time during their careers—the designers at argo are no different. During this course, the argo designers will share mechanisms and strategies for creating successful applications, products and experiences. You will then use these skills and tactics to complete a design project from start-to-finish in one of the following domains: designing for/with cognitive computing, designing for the union of physical objects with digital interactions, or designing for experiences supported by cameras and sensors. At the conclusion of the course, you will not only have gained expertise in a current topic that designers are grappling with, you will have a set of tools that will help you hit the ground running when you start your work in industry.

NOTE: Consent of instructor is needed and upper division standing is required.
Priority will be given to students who have previously taken ITD 301D or who are pursuing the Design Strategies BDP.
If you would like to apply, please send your EID, resume, and a letter of interest to cid@austin.utexas.edu by the application deadline.

Advanced Design Thinking @ IBM Design
(Formerly known as Radical Collaboration)

Unique: TBD, ITD 370
Instructor: Brooks Protzmann
Room: Off-campus at the IBM Design Studio (weekly shuttle transportation is provided)
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm (at IBM Design) and Thursdays 6-9pm (group work on-campus)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to practice what they’ve learned in their respective disciplines and apply it to real-world design problems in an industry setting. This course, taught by a UT instructor, will be hosted off-campus for three hours once per week at the IBM Design Studios in North Austin. Students can get there either by catching the courtesy IBM shuttle to and from campus each class day, or by utilizing their own transportation. Once on-site at IBM, students will be split into groups of 5-7 and assigned design projects that IBM designers have encountered in the past and have had to work through. Each student group will be formed with a variety of majors from different disciplines on campus in order to create a truly multidisciplinary experience and encourage better cross-channel communication. These projects will have deep restrictions, far-reaching applications, and will require learning intense collaboration in an extensive corporate setting to complete. IBM employee mentors and guest speakers will be on-hand to facilitate research and help students wrangle with problems that arise during the projects. At the end of the semester, students will give final group presentations on the findings of their projects and will have a something to add to their professional portfolio.

NOTE: Consent of instructor is needed and upper division standing is required.
Priority will be given to students who have previously taken ITD 301D or who are pursuing the Design Strategies BDP.
If you would like to apply, please send your EID, resume, and a letter of interest to cid@austin.utexas.edu by the application deadline.

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CID Courses

For Fall 2018

The current courses listed are undergraduate only and are open to students of any major.

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Introduction to Integrated Design

Unique: TBD, ITD 101
Instructor: TBD
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Thursdays 6-9pm for five weeks on these dates: 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27

Introduction to the concept of Design Thinking as a core fundamental in education and industry across all disciplines and channels. Guest speakers may facilitate discussion of various innovation issues facing businesses today.

Introduction to Design Thinking

Unique: TBD, ITD 301D
Instructor: Jeff Neely
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm

What is Design Thinking? Most of our daily experience is the result of design, intentional or not. It’s a persistent act. We deal with the consequences all the time. In practice, design is first an act of thinking. Then, those thoughts are applied to the act of making – a product, service, place, or a whole experience like going to Disney World. Design is at its best when designers are thinking and making with people in mind. So, a human-centered mindset is a core attribute of design thinking. Design is at its worst when it’s an afterthought, such as a confusing tax form or most ATMs. In this course, students learn the principles of design thinking and apply them to real-world problems while working in interdisciplinary teams. Students learn how to frame problems, learn about people and their behaviors, then apply those insights to improve products and services through rapid prototyping and iteration. Students from all majors are welcome.

Introduction to Design Thinking

Unique: TBD, ITD 301D
Instructor: Jared Huke
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Wednesdays 6-9pm

What is Design Thinking? Most of our daily experience is the result of design, intentional or not. It’s a persistent act. We deal with the consequences all the time. In practice, design is first an act of thinking. Then, those thoughts are applied to the act of making – a product, service, place, or a whole experience like going to Disney World. Design is at its best when designers are thinking and making with people in mind. So, a human-centered mindset is a core attribute of design thinking. Design is at its worst when it’s an afterthought, such as a confusing tax form or most ATMs. In this course, students learn the principles of design thinking and apply them to real-world problems while working in interdisciplinary teams. Students learn how to frame problems, learn about people and their behaviors, then apply those insights to improve products and services through rapid prototyping and iteration. Students from all majors are welcome.

Sketching for Thinking and Communication

Unique: TBD, ITD 102
Instructor: TBD
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Thursdays 6-9pm for five weeks on these dates: 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/21, 11/1

Sketching is the fastest way to convey ideas, whether in an ideation session or just taking notes in a meeting. Designed to help students learn the basic elements of sketching to visualize concepts and quickly bring alignment to any team.

Introduction to Computer Science Principles

Unique: TBD, ITD 105
Instructor: Lee Brenner
Room: DFA 4.126
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm for five weeks on these dates: 9/4, 9/11, 9/18, 9/25, 10/2

Introduction to the basic principles and terms of logic, programming and computer science for non-computer science majors. Restricted to non-computer science majors.

Intro to Futures Studies

Unique: TBD, ITD 110
Instructor: Jake Dunagan
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Mondays 6-9pm for five weeks on these dates: 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1, 10/8

We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims. – R. Buckminster Fuller

The future is not pre-determined, nor is it random. The choices we make today, based on our current knowledge and interests, cascade through generations. By gaining a deeper understanding of the process of change from a systemic point of view, we can become active, empowered architects of better futures.

Architects of the Future is a short course for leaders, innovators, entrepreneurs, designers, and educators— anyone who wants to increase their foresight capacity and apply it more effectively. Students will have the opportunity to survey the landscape of change ahead, using the lenses of the most powerful methods in futures studies and strategic foresight. Students will then move from being surveyors of possibility to builders of tomorrow, applying a host of practical methods for communicating foresight and designing strategies to motivate action in transformative directions.

Introduction to Prototyping

Unique: TBD, ITD 110
Instructor: Scott Evans, Department of Mechanical Engineering
Room: EER 1.528 – New Engineering Makerspace
Meeting times: Thursdays 3-6pm, for five weeks on these dates: 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27

This course will focus on teams of students creating and testing mechanical prototypes with some electronics and will include case studies, guest speakers and an overview of the overarching design and entrepreneurial processes of great engineering. Emphasis is placed on knowing what to prototype, how to test and what series of prototypes might be needed in terms of the larger effort to solve real problems or create real products.

Introduction to Design and Artificial Intelligence

Unique: TBD, ITD 111
Instructor: Carly Burton
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm for five weeks on these dates: 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6

Introduction to exploring design as a problem-solving tool for real-world scenarios posed from artificial intelligence and robotics. Students have the opportunity to learn how to use design as a problem-solving tool to tackle and solve real-world scenarios poised from AI and robotics. Exposure to a variety of methods to frame learnings into ethical, sustainable and appropriate solutions. Strong emphasis is placed upon the role that design plays in shaping new protocols and practices as it relates to the development of AI.

Creative Entrepreneurship

Unique: TBD, ITD 115
Instructor: Jan Ryan
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Mondays 3-6pm for five weeks on these dates: 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12

In this course students have the opportunity to learn how to use design as a problem-solving tool to tackle and solve real-world scenarios poised from AI and robotics. Students will be exposed to a variety of methods to frame learnings into ethical, sustainable and appropriate solutions. They deconstruct technology industry transformations and how they relate to social phenomena, then move into methods to derive insights that will lead to new systems, strategies, practical models, and supporting narratives. Strong emphasis is placed upon the role that design plays in shaping new protocols and practices as it relates to the development of AI.

Designing for AI Experiences

Unique: TBD, ITD 350
Instructor: John Fremont
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Wednesdays 6-9pm

In this course students will learn how to incorporate design principles with emerging Machine Intelligence technology through hands-on development of a real world business application. Students will be involved in helping identify the issue, develop the design for the application, and will gain skills for visual, verbal, technical creative problem-solving, and a 360 view of the business implications.

Advanced Design for AI

Unique: TBD, ITD 350
Instructor: Jennifer Sukis
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Thursdays 6-9pm 

Advanced exploration of design as a problem-solving tool for real-world scenarios posed from artificial intelligence and robotics. Upper division standing required; this would be an excellent course for people who have already taken DES 301/ITD 301D: Introduction to Design Thinking or ITD 111/150: [Intro to] Design and Artificial Intelligence.

Advanced Ethnographic Research in Design

Unique: TBD, ITD 365
Instructor: Liz Rogers
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Mondays 6-9pm

Focus on how to create actionable insights using ethnographic research. Design Thinking part II. Prerequisite: ITD 301D or DES 301.

Capstone in Integrated Design

Unique: TBD, ITD 375
Instructor: TBD
Room: N/A
Meeting times: N/A

For students pursing the Bridging Disciplines Program Certificate in Design Strategies.

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